I’m a journalist. How can I get data for a story I’m working on?

Email your request to press@secondmeasure.com. Please include the name of your publication, your deadline, the companies you’re interested in, and a brief description of your story. One of our editorial staff members will contact you. If we are able to help with your inquiry, we will email the data to you in an Excel file.

What is Second Measure?

We are a technology company that analyzes billions of everyday purchases to answer real-time questions about U.S. consumer behavior. We offer a self-service platform that helps clients identify fast-growing companies, benchmark competitors, and better understand consumer behavior. The world’s best-known financial firms and corporate brands—from Greylock Partners and Neuberger Berman to Domino’s and Spotify—rely upon Second Measure to make faster and better decisions.

How recent is your data?

Reporters can access data from as early as 2013 and as recent as two weeks ago. We ingest and analyze new data daily.

How many companies do you track?

We currently track nearly 4,000 companies with new ones being added every day.

Do you track international sales?

No. We only observe sales made by U.S. consumers.

Do you have purchase data for privately held companies?

Yes.

Are there types of payments you don’t observe?

We don’t see payments made using cash, check, EBT or gift cards. We don’t track corporate spending. If a third-party retailer sells a product or service, the sale will be attributed to the retailer. (For example, the sale of Nike shoes at Foot Locker would be attributed to Foot Locker, not Nike.)

Can you provide information about spending trends in specific cities or states?

Yes.

Can you provide a comment for my story?

While we have data scientists who are happy to help reporters understand our data and methods, we typically recommend an industry expert for on-the-record interpretation and commentary. (For example, we’d gladly speak to the metrics around a company’s growth, but would stop short of speculating about the cause of that growth or its implications for the company.)